Paper Tablecloths for Halloween

Unlike the huge family holidays, where the pressure is on to use grandma’s heirloom tablecloth, Halloween is a fun, silly holiday, with loads of options when it comes to dressing the table. Whether you’re looking to host a large party, or just trying to spruce up the dining room for yourself during the month of October, you can easily find uses for the many available decorative paper tablecloths for Halloween.

Of course, if you’re willing to expand your horizons just a touch beyond pure paper, and consider the hundreds of styles of plastic & vinyl tablecloths available for Halloween, your options grow almost exponentially. Even better, you could easily select a solid-color paper tablecloth, and layer it with a cool transparent vinyl spider web tablecloth, like this one shown at right. Bear in mind that this could be used over any color tablecloth (not just orange), so if you happen to have white or another shade on hand, you wouldn’t even need to purchase the under-cloth. That said, since this is made of clear vinyl, you might even be able to get away with using it over one of your cloth tablecloths; just make sure it fits completely under the vinyl so you won’t be subjecting it to random drips and stains.

Cool Paper Tablecloths for Halloween

paper tablecloths for Halloween

Another thing to consider is your drink dispenser. While you could opt for a plain punch bowl, or stick with bottled sodas, wouldn’t it be more fun to make a red punch and serve it in this little number? you could even use red wine (assuming it’s an adults-only party). Another option if you’re serving wine are
these cute labels from bonestudio.net, which cover the wine’s original label and make it look like your guests are drinking something spooky or toxic, like a witches’ brew! If you’re catering to a younger crowd, there are similar labels sized for two-liter bottles. If you consider some of the gruesome green colors that sodas come in, it wouldn’t be much of a stretch to believe you’re drinking poison.

Don’t forget to jazz up your tableware, too! There are some really cute options, including the adorable skull-shaped cupcake molds shown at right. A little bit of pink frosting in the shape of brain crenellations, and voila! Instant cute-but-creepy party nibbles! If you’re having a buffet, there are also plates, cups & napkins in several designs, from kiddie cute to bloody good.

As I mentioned, there are also loads of plastic table coverings which work well with the Halloween theme. If you’re bored of traditional orange & black (or the more modern combo of purple and poison green), you can mix it up with a table cover that looks like it has blood dripping down off of it. Just like standard paper tablecloths for Halloween, this variation would offer easy cleanup, and no tears even if someone overturns the entire dip bowl on it. Something that just couldn’t be said if you were using an expensive linen tablecloth!

You could also easily spruce up a single-color or very simple paper tablecloth for Halloween with the decorations you use on the table. If you haven’t looked into Halloween table decorations lately, there are some surprisingly inexpensive & snazzy options out there. Black candelabras come in both disposable and re-usable forms, or you could just pop a couple of blood-dripping candles into your existing candlesticks. And if you’re sure your guests aren’t the squeamish type, you could even go whole hog with a bloody gauze look like this! If you’re not sure about your guests’ comfort level, you could instead opt for a simple black gauze table covering. It works much better than trying to string faux spider webs over your table tops (trust me, I’ve tried it), and lends the air of a burial shroud without the in-your-face gore factor.

All in all, there are loads of ways to spruce up even the most plain of paper tablecloths for Halloween. Which route you choose to go will be limited only by your personal taste (and perhaps the age of your guests)

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